The second in our series of exhibitions covering the classical traditions of figurative painting focuses on Still Life. Three artists of differing ages and experience all practice within this area, using different media and subjects their individual concerns bring a freshness to the genre.

John Newberry RWS. John has spent his lifetime painting in watercolour, for many years he taught at the Ruskin School in Oxford, today he paints from his home in Somerset. Flowers are picked from his garden and placed in small vases or jars, their careful placement against blank paper backgrounds results in a dynamic composition and allows for total focus on the flower subject realised beautifully with his light watercolour touch. 68The second in our series of exhibitions covering the classical traditions of figurative painting focuses on Still Life. Three artists of differing ages and experience all practice within this area, using different media and subjects their individual concerns bring a freshness to the genre.

Mark Rochester. As a life-long collector of ceramics and a passionate gardener, Mark’s painting combines these two loves with pattern making skills gained from a 30 year career as a textile and wallpaper designer. Chosen pieces are coupled with stems of fresh flowers which complement the colour and style of the ceramics. Using a flattening aerial viewpoint his compositions are decorative and thought provoking in their quirky mixes of subjects.

Niggy Dowler. Niggy is self taught, her talent natural and prodigious. She has been painting full time for less than a year and was included in Wells Contemporary Exhibition last autumn.  Using an aerial view Niggy associates two favourite subject matters  the natural form of fruits and the intricate man-made patterning on china. Painting in oils in such detail absorbs her attention and encourages a healing and “in the moment” experience.